"Over the past two years, Tumblr has become more than just a fad. It has become a space where libraries can connect with their local community as well as a global network of people and institutions interested in literature, technology, and culture."

thepenguinpress:

Via Flavorwire

The 35 Writers Who Run the Literary Internet

Zadie Smith

No Twitter, no personal blog, and close to 35k fans following the Facebook page that her publisher runs for her; Zadie Smith really has zero personal Internet presence, save for maybe her sporadic posts on the New York Review of Books website. Yet while Smith might not have a clever Twitter handle, she’s all over social media proxy, with her many fans sharing quotes, articles, and her live talks (with fellow Internet-shy authors Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie or Karl Ove Knausgård) all the time. She’s one of the few big-name writers who has managed to develop a huge Internet presence without even seeming to spend much time online.

Neil Gaiman

It isn’t simply the over two million Twitter followers that make Gaimain an online powerhouse — it’s that he seems to genuinely enjoy interacting with his fans. The fact is, he had a massive following long before anyone knew what “social media” was, and doesn’t really need to tweet or use his Tumblr with such frequency to promote his work. That he spends so much time online, regardless, is what makes his noticeable presence very welcome.

John Green

Have you ever gone to Tumblr and looked at how many posts are tagged “John Green“? It’s a rabbit hole worth falling down at least once. Then there’s the 2.85 million people who follow him on Twitter — making Green easily one of the most popular writers on the Internet, and one who’s always interacting with fans.

Rachel Fershleiser 

A book evangelist, Fershleiser spends her days doing literary and nonprofit outreach at Tumblr, and takes any chance she can to talk about the “Bookternet.” She tweets all the time, has given a TEDx talk on the literary Internet, and, of course, she’s very active on Tumblr.

See the rest of the list here!

Zadie, call me!

(Source: badbloody)

  1. Camera: iPhone 5
  2. Aperture: f/2.4
  3. Exposure: 1/20th
  4. Focal Length: 4mm
harkaway:

wordbookstores:

The word “lurve” was invented for how WORD feels about Nick Harkaway.

It’s this whole mutual thing we have going on :)

I ship it.

harkaway:

wordbookstores:

The word “lurve” was invented for how WORD feels about Nick Harkaway.

It’s this whole mutual thing we have going on :)

I ship it.

pitchforkreviewsreviews:

pitchforkreviewsreviews:

My book comes out next Tuesday, July 22, and you can pre-order it here, but regardless of whether you pre-order it (although you still should, please, occasionally the publisher reminds me that part of the reason they are publishing the book is to actually sell copies of the book), you are hereby invited to the book party! It is at The POWERHOUSE Arena, a bookstore in Dumbo (37 Main St., Brooklyn, NY 11201) that is the only bookstore I’ve ever been inside that could legitimately lay claim to a name as sick as “The POWERHOUSE Arena.” Although pretty much every bookstore is sick in its own way, this one really is an arena.

The party is on Thursday, July 31from 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. and there will be an open bar. There will be DJ sets from Jon Caramanica (face all the way on the left), Sasha Frere-Jones (face next to his), and Tao Lin (face all the way on the right). Also, I will be “in conversation” with Jesse Cohen, one half of the band Tanlines and also the host of the podcast “No Effects.”

What I can promise is that if you come, you will have an amazing time, meet and make connections with people you will become close friends with, forge memories that will last for the rest of your life, and get trashed for free. This is all I can promise. I hope you will consider coming.

To entice you to come to this book party on Thursday, I bought 50 lighters and several hundred cigarettes from a Native American reservation that will be sitting on a table outside the party for you to smoke! No one will try to bum a cigarette from you and you won’t have to bum one from anyone else. Cigarettes are so expensive in New York, so reasonable at Native American reservations just outside of New York. If this doesn’t get you to come, I’m out of ideas. Really hope to see you there! Information above.

image

I don’t smoke and I will be in Orlando, BUT YOU KIDS HAVE FUN!

em-chen:

" ‘…It’s more of a clafoutis.’
Frida could have laughed. She hadn’t heard that word in a long while. 
'Think of it as a sweet pancake,' Anika explained. 'It's French, and traditionally made with cherries.'
'I know what it is, Anika.'
'Do you now?'”
- California, Chapter 13
I was inspired by this passage to finally bake a clafoutis. I’ve been meaning to try out this recipe and had an overabundance of both cherries and time this weekend. 
I’m not sure Anika actually knew what a clafoutis is or if she was intentionally being obtuse to test Frida. It’s definitely not what I would describe as a “sweet pancake” since it has such a thick, custard-y batter and baked flan-like texture. It was a simple recipe with common ingredients that would no doubt be extremely difficult to acquire in Frida’s reality. I felt a little guilty that I still had the luxury of baking a dessert like this when she ordinarily could not. Surprisingly, baked cherries taste no different than the cherries that come in canned pie filling (do not like…). Pretty sure that I’m going to avoid baking cherries from now on. However, it was very light dessert, despite it’s heavy appearance.
The clafoutis was an analogy for how I felt about the middle chapters of California. I was expecting something heavier, more menacing in these chapters, but was presented with a more day-in-the-life view of the settlers of the Land. Cal was definitely justified in his growing paranoia, especially with bits of Micah’s crazy popping up every so often like the unexpected taste of baked cherries for me in each bite. I also wondered if the reason why Anika didn’t have cherries was because of her/their fear of the color red, or if it was actually due to a lack of supply. 
The idea of the clafoutis and the flavors I was expecting of it was much like how the ideals and practices of the Plankers played out in the Land. A little lackluster, disappointing. It looked pretty, but didn’t have the substance I was looking for. To quote another reblogbookclubber: “While [the] seminar is a very powerful method of learning and dealing with texts, there is also the danger of only living in hypotheticals.” In theory, it sounds like it would be great! In practice, not so much. 
Although what do I know. My mom loved it. 

Now *THIS* is my kind of fan art! em-chen:

" ‘…It’s more of a clafoutis.’
Frida could have laughed. She hadn’t heard that word in a long while. 
'Think of it as a sweet pancake,' Anika explained. 'It's French, and traditionally made with cherries.'
'I know what it is, Anika.'
'Do you now?'”
- California, Chapter 13
I was inspired by this passage to finally bake a clafoutis. I’ve been meaning to try out this recipe and had an overabundance of both cherries and time this weekend. 
I’m not sure Anika actually knew what a clafoutis is or if she was intentionally being obtuse to test Frida. It’s definitely not what I would describe as a “sweet pancake” since it has such a thick, custard-y batter and baked flan-like texture. It was a simple recipe with common ingredients that would no doubt be extremely difficult to acquire in Frida’s reality. I felt a little guilty that I still had the luxury of baking a dessert like this when she ordinarily could not. Surprisingly, baked cherries taste no different than the cherries that come in canned pie filling (do not like…). Pretty sure that I’m going to avoid baking cherries from now on. However, it was very light dessert, despite it’s heavy appearance.
The clafoutis was an analogy for how I felt about the middle chapters of California. I was expecting something heavier, more menacing in these chapters, but was presented with a more day-in-the-life view of the settlers of the Land. Cal was definitely justified in his growing paranoia, especially with bits of Micah’s crazy popping up every so often like the unexpected taste of baked cherries for me in each bite. I also wondered if the reason why Anika didn’t have cherries was because of her/their fear of the color red, or if it was actually due to a lack of supply. 
The idea of the clafoutis and the flavors I was expecting of it was much like how the ideals and practices of the Plankers played out in the Land. A little lackluster, disappointing. It looked pretty, but didn’t have the substance I was looking for. To quote another reblogbookclubber: “While [the] seminar is a very powerful method of learning and dealing with texts, there is also the danger of only living in hypotheticals.” In theory, it sounds like it would be great! In practice, not so much. 
Although what do I know. My mom loved it. 

Now *THIS* is my kind of fan art! em-chen:

" ‘…It’s more of a clafoutis.’
Frida could have laughed. She hadn’t heard that word in a long while. 
'Think of it as a sweet pancake,' Anika explained. 'It's French, and traditionally made with cherries.'
'I know what it is, Anika.'
'Do you now?'”
- California, Chapter 13
I was inspired by this passage to finally bake a clafoutis. I’ve been meaning to try out this recipe and had an overabundance of both cherries and time this weekend. 
I’m not sure Anika actually knew what a clafoutis is or if she was intentionally being obtuse to test Frida. It’s definitely not what I would describe as a “sweet pancake” since it has such a thick, custard-y batter and baked flan-like texture. It was a simple recipe with common ingredients that would no doubt be extremely difficult to acquire in Frida’s reality. I felt a little guilty that I still had the luxury of baking a dessert like this when she ordinarily could not. Surprisingly, baked cherries taste no different than the cherries that come in canned pie filling (do not like…). Pretty sure that I’m going to avoid baking cherries from now on. However, it was very light dessert, despite it’s heavy appearance.
The clafoutis was an analogy for how I felt about the middle chapters of California. I was expecting something heavier, more menacing in these chapters, but was presented with a more day-in-the-life view of the settlers of the Land. Cal was definitely justified in his growing paranoia, especially with bits of Micah’s crazy popping up every so often like the unexpected taste of baked cherries for me in each bite. I also wondered if the reason why Anika didn’t have cherries was because of her/their fear of the color red, or if it was actually due to a lack of supply. 
The idea of the clafoutis and the flavors I was expecting of it was much like how the ideals and practices of the Plankers played out in the Land. A little lackluster, disappointing. It looked pretty, but didn’t have the substance I was looking for. To quote another reblogbookclubber: “While [the] seminar is a very powerful method of learning and dealing with texts, there is also the danger of only living in hypotheticals.” In theory, it sounds like it would be great! In practice, not so much. 
Although what do I know. My mom loved it. 

Now *THIS* is my kind of fan art!

em-chen:

" ‘…It’s more of a clafoutis.’

Frida could have laughed. She hadn’t heard that word in a long while. 

'Think of it as a sweet pancake,' Anika explained. 'It's French, and traditionally made with cherries.'

'I know what it is, Anika.'

'Do you now?'”

California, Chapter 13

I was inspired by this passage to finally bake a clafoutis. I’ve been meaning to try out this recipe and had an overabundance of both cherries and time this weekend. 

I’m not sure Anika actually knew what a clafoutis is or if she was intentionally being obtuse to test Frida. It’s definitely not what I would describe as a “sweet pancake” since it has such a thick, custard-y batter and baked flan-like texture. It was a simple recipe with common ingredients that would no doubt be extremely difficult to acquire in Frida’s reality. I felt a little guilty that I still had the luxury of baking a dessert like this when she ordinarily could not. Surprisingly, baked cherries taste no different than the cherries that come in canned pie filling (do not like…). Pretty sure that I’m going to avoid baking cherries from now on. However, it was very light dessert, despite it’s heavy appearance.

The clafoutis was an analogy for how I felt about the middle chapters of California. I was expecting something heavier, more menacing in these chapters, but was presented with a more day-in-the-life view of the settlers of the Land. Cal was definitely justified in his growing paranoia, especially with bits of Micah’s crazy popping up every so often like the unexpected taste of baked cherries for me in each bite. I also wondered if the reason why Anika didn’t have cherries was because of her/their fear of the color red, or if it was actually due to a lack of supply. 

The idea of the clafoutis and the flavors I was expecting of it was much like how the ideals and practices of the Plankers played out in the Land. A little lackluster, disappointing. It looked pretty, but didn’t have the substance I was looking for. To quote another reblogbookclubber: “While [the] seminar is a very powerful method of learning and dealing with texts, there is also the danger of only living in hypotheticals.” In theory, it sounds like it would be great! In practice, not so much. 

Although what do I know. My mom loved it. 

Now *THIS* is my kind of fan art!

jamiatt:

At last, the carrot has come home.

#blessed

  1. Aperture: f/2.8
  2. Exposure: 1/30th
  3. Focal Length: 3mm
books:

Big news! In one week we’ll be holding the first-ever books.tumblr.com cover reveal! Check back next Monday, August 4, for the exclusive debut of the cover for Nova Ren Suma’s new YA novel The Walls Around Us. 
We’re hearing lots of great buzz about this new one from the author of Imaginary Girls and 17 & Gone. It’s a ghostly story of suspense involving a young dancer and a girls’ juvenile detention center—just think of it as “Orange Is the New Black Swan.”  

Here’s something fun and new we’re trying!

books:

Big news! In one week we’ll be holding the first-ever books.tumblr.com cover reveal! Check back next Monday, August 4, for the exclusive debut of the cover for Nova Ren Suma’s new YA novel The Walls Around Us.

We’re hearing lots of great buzz about this new one from the author of Imaginary Girls and 17 & Gone. It’s a ghostly story of suspense involving a young dancer and a girls’ juvenile detention center—just think of it as “Orange Is the New Black Swan.” 

Here’s something fun and new we’re trying!

"I finished tonight and oh my god, tumblr is going to crash when reblog book club gets to that last chapter."

- Jaime Green (via reblogbookclub)

I loved California. Edan was so completely lying when she leaned over and very visibly told Colbert that the book has a happy ending. The ending is so much more complex than happy or not.

(via jaimealyse)

Seasonably inappropriate and delicious.