A group of writers and editors will participate in a digital storytelling experiment using Tumblr. For three days, they will collaborate on a story in the style of the “exquisite corpse.” Each writer will take a turn adding to a single story with text, images, videos, and audio at their disposal. We’ll follow the story session with a panel discussion with the authors to discuss the experiment as well as their experience in digital storytelling and using the Internet to market creative work.

(via http://electroniccorpse.tumblr.com/)

I’m part of this collaborative writing project with some amazing people I really admire. Follow it, pretty please?

thelifeguardlibrarian:

EveryLibrary continues on towards becoming the first national, establish PAC for libraries!

Please consider donating your money or time in promotion of this important and exciting cause.

EveryLibrary will be the first and only national organization dedicated exclusively to political action at a local level to create, renew, and protect public funding for libraries of all types.

Libraries need to talk to voters directly about the bonds, levys, milliages, and referendum that build, renovate, or expand library services for the next generation. Any library initiative anywhere matters to every library everywhere. Make your pledge today.

Click here to give! And stay tuned for the launch of EveryLibrary’s very own Tumblr, coming soon!

This special interest group specially interests me. Maybe it specially interests you too?

"When I left high school, I had all my plans to go to college, but I had no money. And I decided then, the best thing for me to do is not worry about getting money to go to college — I will educate myself. I walked down the street, I walked into a library, I would go to the library three days a week for ten years and I would educate myself. It’s all FREE, that’s the great thing about libraries! Most of you can afford to go to college, but if you wanna educate yourself completely, go to the library and educate yourself. When I was 28 years old, I graduated from Library."

Ray Bradbury on libraries and educating yourself (via explore-blog)

If Bradbury did this, why do we still call it The Good Will Hunting plan?

(Source: )

Due to a loss of federal funding, today is the last day of our RIF program (a reading incentive program that gives kids the opportunity to obtain free books to keep). To steal a phrase from the kids: this really sucks. One 11-year-old girl, who signs into RIF every week, more eloquently expressed her feelings about RIF ending in this letter. (via Screwy Decimal: Goodbye, RIF)

marginwalking:

Go to www.rif.org/advocate to save this excellent program. (Taken with Instagram)

I grew up on RIF. Please click the link to quickly and easily contact your representatives!

Encyclopedia Brown books (by Nick Douglas)

Took this at the Lima Library a few years ago….

(via Sophie Blackall: Exhibition at the Brooklyn Public Library)

Oh boy oh boy oh boy! Who wants to go see this with me?

darienlibrary:

Tumbl-ing from the Library Journal Day of Dialog here with tumblr user libraryjournal.

All hail more celebrarians!

booyahgrandmere:

This morning I toured a MAGIC LIBRARY. What’s a magic library you say? It is a special collection for magicians, of course! I originally heard about it while reading Fooling Houdini: Magicians, Mentalists, Math Geeks, and the Hidden Powers of the Mind which is a fascinating book coming out this June about magic and math. So because I always oblige when someone asks for a tour of my library, I decided hey why not and emailed the Conjuring Arts Research Center asking for a tour.
A few things of note:
1. I asked them how they handle collection development since the librarians there seem to be archivists, not magicians. This is when I was informed that they have a “resident magician” (!!!) who does most of the collection development. 
2. The librarian explained to me that their most difficult type of researcher is an actual magician. Why? Because they are very good at making things disappear. She was not joking. They have to literally keep careful watch over magician researchers so they won’t  make any rare manuscripts POOF disappear.
3. Their catalog, which is only available to members, is called Alexander. I was curious to know where the name came from since most libraries have adorable stories for how they named their online access catalog (although my alma mater’s is named Aladin, which…boring). Turns out it is named after Alexander, a mentalist who was made famous by his ability to read minds. THIS IS A MAGIC LIBRARY JOKE.
4. On my way out, the resident magician performed a trick for me. At first I was excited until I realized it was a trick my dad used to play on us when we were small called Black Magic. The resident magician must have assumed I was a magic rookie.

This is just so awesome I am out of words. booyahgrandmere:

This morning I toured a MAGIC LIBRARY. What’s a magic library you say? It is a special collection for magicians, of course! I originally heard about it while reading Fooling Houdini: Magicians, Mentalists, Math Geeks, and the Hidden Powers of the Mind which is a fascinating book coming out this June about magic and math. So because I always oblige when someone asks for a tour of my library, I decided hey why not and emailed the Conjuring Arts Research Center asking for a tour.
A few things of note:
1. I asked them how they handle collection development since the librarians there seem to be archivists, not magicians. This is when I was informed that they have a “resident magician” (!!!) who does most of the collection development. 
2. The librarian explained to me that their most difficult type of researcher is an actual magician. Why? Because they are very good at making things disappear. She was not joking. They have to literally keep careful watch over magician researchers so they won’t  make any rare manuscripts POOF disappear.
3. Their catalog, which is only available to members, is called Alexander. I was curious to know where the name came from since most libraries have adorable stories for how they named their online access catalog (although my alma mater’s is named Aladin, which…boring). Turns out it is named after Alexander, a mentalist who was made famous by his ability to read minds. THIS IS A MAGIC LIBRARY JOKE.
4. On my way out, the resident magician performed a trick for me. At first I was excited until I realized it was a trick my dad used to play on us when we were small called Black Magic. The resident magician must have assumed I was a magic rookie.

This is just so awesome I am out of words. booyahgrandmere:

This morning I toured a MAGIC LIBRARY. What’s a magic library you say? It is a special collection for magicians, of course! I originally heard about it while reading Fooling Houdini: Magicians, Mentalists, Math Geeks, and the Hidden Powers of the Mind which is a fascinating book coming out this June about magic and math. So because I always oblige when someone asks for a tour of my library, I decided hey why not and emailed the Conjuring Arts Research Center asking for a tour.
A few things of note:
1. I asked them how they handle collection development since the librarians there seem to be archivists, not magicians. This is when I was informed that they have a “resident magician” (!!!) who does most of the collection development. 
2. The librarian explained to me that their most difficult type of researcher is an actual magician. Why? Because they are very good at making things disappear. She was not joking. They have to literally keep careful watch over magician researchers so they won’t  make any rare manuscripts POOF disappear.
3. Their catalog, which is only available to members, is called Alexander. I was curious to know where the name came from since most libraries have adorable stories for how they named their online access catalog (although my alma mater’s is named Aladin, which…boring). Turns out it is named after Alexander, a mentalist who was made famous by his ability to read minds. THIS IS A MAGIC LIBRARY JOKE.
4. On my way out, the resident magician performed a trick for me. At first I was excited until I realized it was a trick my dad used to play on us when we were small called Black Magic. The resident magician must have assumed I was a magic rookie.

This is just so awesome I am out of words.

booyahgrandmere:

This morning I toured a MAGIC LIBRARY. What’s a magic library you say? It is a special collection for magicians, of course! I originally heard about it while reading Fooling Houdini: Magicians, Mentalists, Math Geeks, and the Hidden Powers of the Mind which is a fascinating book coming out this June about magic and math. So because I always oblige when someone asks for a tour of my library, I decided hey why not and emailed the Conjuring Arts Research Center asking for a tour.

A few things of note:

1. I asked them how they handle collection development since the librarians there seem to be archivists, not magicians. This is when I was informed that they have a “resident magician” (!!!) who does most of the collection development. 

2. The librarian explained to me that their most difficult type of researcher is an actual magician. Why? Because they are very good at making things disappear. She was not joking. They have to literally keep careful watch over magician researchers so they won’t  make any rare manuscripts POOF disappear.

3. Their catalog, which is only available to members, is called Alexander. I was curious to know where the name came from since most libraries have adorable stories for how they named their online access catalog (although my alma mater’s is named Aladin, which…boring). Turns out it is named after Alexander, a mentalist who was made famous by his ability to read minds. THIS IS A MAGIC LIBRARY JOKE.

4. On my way out, the resident magician performed a trick for me. At first I was excited until I realized it was a trick my dad used to play on us when we were small called Black Magic. The resident magician must have assumed I was a magic rookie.

This is just so awesome I am out of words.