margaretzamosmonteith:

And then I made miso vegetable soup for lunch…#cooking #stocktips #soup

yummmmm

annaverity:

Baked Potato Soup

Stock Tips season is coming!

missrumphiusproject:

Tortellini soup made with beef stock, pork stock, and chicken stock. Also, grilled kielbasa. #stock tips #soup #food

Oh man, this looks perfect.

#stocktips

#stocktips: fill your bowl with greens and grated parm, then ladle your stock on top

August schmaugust #stocktips

The phenomenally talented yadykates was appalled to learn that I did not own a proper spoon rest despite my frequent soup-making. Look what she made for me! It is 100% flawless — unfortunately I can’t say the same for the US Postal Service. Krazy Glue though!

  1. Camera: iPhone 5c
  2. Aperture: f/2.4
  3. Exposure: 1/20th
  4. Focal Length: 4mm
willteachforfood:jesstugas and I made ramen after a trip to one of Albany’s fantastic Asian grocery stores. We got the pork belly, seaweed, bonito, and kansui (alkaline salts) from the Asian market, and everything else came from the local P-Chops. The noodles were incredibly chewy and dense (thanks to the kansui), and the broth was really rich and flavorful thanks to the pork bones and chicken thighs. 
I used an amalgamation of a few different recipes and techniques.
Broth: 
~2lb pork bones
2-3 chicken thighs, bone-in, skin-on 
ginger, a 2-3” knob (peeled and cut into 1/4” or so thick slices)
1 head’s worth of garlic cloves, whole and peeled
2 bunches of scallion whites (cut them off just short of where they start to turn green)
1 large white onion, quartered and split into chunks (skin on or off, doesn’t matter)
2-3 shallots, halved (skin on or off, same as the onion)
enough water to cover all the stuff
Put everything but the pork and chicken on a sheet pan and broil on high for 5-7 minutes, until just slightly charred. put the bones, chicken thighs, and roasted veg in a stockpot and top with water. Bring to a boil, and bring down to a very low simmer. Let it go for 8-12 hours, topping off with water as needed. Strain, return to the pot, and keep hot until needed. (This can be done the day before)

Pork Belly
~2lb raw uncured pork belly (you’ll have to go to either a butcher or an Asian grocery store)
~2” knob of ginger, sliced
~6-8 cloves of garlic, whole, peeled
1 large onion, quartered (skin still on)
a handful of scallions, roughly chopped
1c water
1/2c soy sauce (I used low-sodium, not sure how much of a difference it makes)
1/4c mirin (sweetened rice wine for cooking, you can find this at most well-stocked supermarkets or at any asian market)
1/4c sake (I didn’t have any sake on hand, as one could imagine in upstate New York, so I used apple cider vinegar. It provides the same acidity and sweetness, and the flavor cooks off anyway. I’ve subbed in cider vinegar for sake in numerous recipes, and it always comes out just fine)
~1-2 tbsp honey or sugar
Bring the water, soy, mirin, and sake/vinegar to a boil and then bring down to a simmer in a dutch oven or any other heavy lidded pot. Add the ginger, garlic, scallions, and pork belly (which has been rolled and tied like in the picture), cover with the lid, and put in the oven at 275*F for 3-4 hours, flipping the pork belly every hour or so. Remove pork and braising liquid to a sealable container and refrigerate overnight (or until completely chilled)

Noodles
300g AP Flour
1/2c warm water
1tsp Kansui (Alkaline salts. This adds acidity to the dough and apparently makes the noodles much more dense and chewy)
Mix together all ingredients in a bowl until the dough comes together. Knead and fold until it forms very stiff, dense mass. Roll and fold 3-4 times, then cover with plastic wrap for an hour or so. Run through a pasta roller starting on the widest setting until you get to a spaghetti/linguini thickness (my pasta roller’s setting #5), then cut into noodles. Cook for ~30sec in boiling water and serve immediately.
Assembling the dish
Slice your chilled pork belly, and put the slices in the braising liquid or broth to heat them back up. Cook your noodles, and strain them into whatever bowl you’re using. Ladle the broth over the noodles, top with the sliced and reheated pork belly, and season/garnish to taste with soy sauce, sriracha, sliced garlic, parsley, whatever you feel like putting on top. 

Check out Serious Eats for the inspiration for the recipe for the broth and the pork belly, and No Recipe for the noodles (No Recipe called for bread flour, but I used AP to no ill effect).  willteachforfood:jesstugas and I made ramen after a trip to one of Albany’s fantastic Asian grocery stores. We got the pork belly, seaweed, bonito, and kansui (alkaline salts) from the Asian market, and everything else came from the local P-Chops. The noodles were incredibly chewy and dense (thanks to the kansui), and the broth was really rich and flavorful thanks to the pork bones and chicken thighs. 
I used an amalgamation of a few different recipes and techniques.
Broth: 
~2lb pork bones
2-3 chicken thighs, bone-in, skin-on 
ginger, a 2-3” knob (peeled and cut into 1/4” or so thick slices)
1 head’s worth of garlic cloves, whole and peeled
2 bunches of scallion whites (cut them off just short of where they start to turn green)
1 large white onion, quartered and split into chunks (skin on or off, doesn’t matter)
2-3 shallots, halved (skin on or off, same as the onion)
enough water to cover all the stuff
Put everything but the pork and chicken on a sheet pan and broil on high for 5-7 minutes, until just slightly charred. put the bones, chicken thighs, and roasted veg in a stockpot and top with water. Bring to a boil, and bring down to a very low simmer. Let it go for 8-12 hours, topping off with water as needed. Strain, return to the pot, and keep hot until needed. (This can be done the day before)

Pork Belly
~2lb raw uncured pork belly (you’ll have to go to either a butcher or an Asian grocery store)
~2” knob of ginger, sliced
~6-8 cloves of garlic, whole, peeled
1 large onion, quartered (skin still on)
a handful of scallions, roughly chopped
1c water
1/2c soy sauce (I used low-sodium, not sure how much of a difference it makes)
1/4c mirin (sweetened rice wine for cooking, you can find this at most well-stocked supermarkets or at any asian market)
1/4c sake (I didn’t have any sake on hand, as one could imagine in upstate New York, so I used apple cider vinegar. It provides the same acidity and sweetness, and the flavor cooks off anyway. I’ve subbed in cider vinegar for sake in numerous recipes, and it always comes out just fine)
~1-2 tbsp honey or sugar
Bring the water, soy, mirin, and sake/vinegar to a boil and then bring down to a simmer in a dutch oven or any other heavy lidded pot. Add the ginger, garlic, scallions, and pork belly (which has been rolled and tied like in the picture), cover with the lid, and put in the oven at 275*F for 3-4 hours, flipping the pork belly every hour or so. Remove pork and braising liquid to a sealable container and refrigerate overnight (or until completely chilled)

Noodles
300g AP Flour
1/2c warm water
1tsp Kansui (Alkaline salts. This adds acidity to the dough and apparently makes the noodles much more dense and chewy)
Mix together all ingredients in a bowl until the dough comes together. Knead and fold until it forms very stiff, dense mass. Roll and fold 3-4 times, then cover with plastic wrap for an hour or so. Run through a pasta roller starting on the widest setting until you get to a spaghetti/linguini thickness (my pasta roller’s setting #5), then cut into noodles. Cook for ~30sec in boiling water and serve immediately.
Assembling the dish
Slice your chilled pork belly, and put the slices in the braising liquid or broth to heat them back up. Cook your noodles, and strain them into whatever bowl you’re using. Ladle the broth over the noodles, top with the sliced and reheated pork belly, and season/garnish to taste with soy sauce, sriracha, sliced garlic, parsley, whatever you feel like putting on top. 

Check out Serious Eats for the inspiration for the recipe for the broth and the pork belly, and No Recipe for the noodles (No Recipe called for bread flour, but I used AP to no ill effect).  willteachforfood:jesstugas and I made ramen after a trip to one of Albany’s fantastic Asian grocery stores. We got the pork belly, seaweed, bonito, and kansui (alkaline salts) from the Asian market, and everything else came from the local P-Chops. The noodles were incredibly chewy and dense (thanks to the kansui), and the broth was really rich and flavorful thanks to the pork bones and chicken thighs. 
I used an amalgamation of a few different recipes and techniques.
Broth: 
~2lb pork bones
2-3 chicken thighs, bone-in, skin-on 
ginger, a 2-3” knob (peeled and cut into 1/4” or so thick slices)
1 head’s worth of garlic cloves, whole and peeled
2 bunches of scallion whites (cut them off just short of where they start to turn green)
1 large white onion, quartered and split into chunks (skin on or off, doesn’t matter)
2-3 shallots, halved (skin on or off, same as the onion)
enough water to cover all the stuff
Put everything but the pork and chicken on a sheet pan and broil on high for 5-7 minutes, until just slightly charred. put the bones, chicken thighs, and roasted veg in a stockpot and top with water. Bring to a boil, and bring down to a very low simmer. Let it go for 8-12 hours, topping off with water as needed. Strain, return to the pot, and keep hot until needed. (This can be done the day before)

Pork Belly
~2lb raw uncured pork belly (you’ll have to go to either a butcher or an Asian grocery store)
~2” knob of ginger, sliced
~6-8 cloves of garlic, whole, peeled
1 large onion, quartered (skin still on)
a handful of scallions, roughly chopped
1c water
1/2c soy sauce (I used low-sodium, not sure how much of a difference it makes)
1/4c mirin (sweetened rice wine for cooking, you can find this at most well-stocked supermarkets or at any asian market)
1/4c sake (I didn’t have any sake on hand, as one could imagine in upstate New York, so I used apple cider vinegar. It provides the same acidity and sweetness, and the flavor cooks off anyway. I’ve subbed in cider vinegar for sake in numerous recipes, and it always comes out just fine)
~1-2 tbsp honey or sugar
Bring the water, soy, mirin, and sake/vinegar to a boil and then bring down to a simmer in a dutch oven or any other heavy lidded pot. Add the ginger, garlic, scallions, and pork belly (which has been rolled and tied like in the picture), cover with the lid, and put in the oven at 275*F for 3-4 hours, flipping the pork belly every hour or so. Remove pork and braising liquid to a sealable container and refrigerate overnight (or until completely chilled)

Noodles
300g AP Flour
1/2c warm water
1tsp Kansui (Alkaline salts. This adds acidity to the dough and apparently makes the noodles much more dense and chewy)
Mix together all ingredients in a bowl until the dough comes together. Knead and fold until it forms very stiff, dense mass. Roll and fold 3-4 times, then cover with plastic wrap for an hour or so. Run through a pasta roller starting on the widest setting until you get to a spaghetti/linguini thickness (my pasta roller’s setting #5), then cut into noodles. Cook for ~30sec in boiling water and serve immediately.
Assembling the dish
Slice your chilled pork belly, and put the slices in the braising liquid or broth to heat them back up. Cook your noodles, and strain them into whatever bowl you’re using. Ladle the broth over the noodles, top with the sliced and reheated pork belly, and season/garnish to taste with soy sauce, sriracha, sliced garlic, parsley, whatever you feel like putting on top. 

Check out Serious Eats for the inspiration for the recipe for the broth and the pork belly, and No Recipe for the noodles (No Recipe called for bread flour, but I used AP to no ill effect).  willteachforfood:jesstugas and I made ramen after a trip to one of Albany’s fantastic Asian grocery stores. We got the pork belly, seaweed, bonito, and kansui (alkaline salts) from the Asian market, and everything else came from the local P-Chops. The noodles were incredibly chewy and dense (thanks to the kansui), and the broth was really rich and flavorful thanks to the pork bones and chicken thighs. 
I used an amalgamation of a few different recipes and techniques.
Broth: 
~2lb pork bones
2-3 chicken thighs, bone-in, skin-on 
ginger, a 2-3” knob (peeled and cut into 1/4” or so thick slices)
1 head’s worth of garlic cloves, whole and peeled
2 bunches of scallion whites (cut them off just short of where they start to turn green)
1 large white onion, quartered and split into chunks (skin on or off, doesn’t matter)
2-3 shallots, halved (skin on or off, same as the onion)
enough water to cover all the stuff
Put everything but the pork and chicken on a sheet pan and broil on high for 5-7 minutes, until just slightly charred. put the bones, chicken thighs, and roasted veg in a stockpot and top with water. Bring to a boil, and bring down to a very low simmer. Let it go for 8-12 hours, topping off with water as needed. Strain, return to the pot, and keep hot until needed. (This can be done the day before)

Pork Belly
~2lb raw uncured pork belly (you’ll have to go to either a butcher or an Asian grocery store)
~2” knob of ginger, sliced
~6-8 cloves of garlic, whole, peeled
1 large onion, quartered (skin still on)
a handful of scallions, roughly chopped
1c water
1/2c soy sauce (I used low-sodium, not sure how much of a difference it makes)
1/4c mirin (sweetened rice wine for cooking, you can find this at most well-stocked supermarkets or at any asian market)
1/4c sake (I didn’t have any sake on hand, as one could imagine in upstate New York, so I used apple cider vinegar. It provides the same acidity and sweetness, and the flavor cooks off anyway. I’ve subbed in cider vinegar for sake in numerous recipes, and it always comes out just fine)
~1-2 tbsp honey or sugar
Bring the water, soy, mirin, and sake/vinegar to a boil and then bring down to a simmer in a dutch oven or any other heavy lidded pot. Add the ginger, garlic, scallions, and pork belly (which has been rolled and tied like in the picture), cover with the lid, and put in the oven at 275*F for 3-4 hours, flipping the pork belly every hour or so. Remove pork and braising liquid to a sealable container and refrigerate overnight (or until completely chilled)

Noodles
300g AP Flour
1/2c warm water
1tsp Kansui (Alkaline salts. This adds acidity to the dough and apparently makes the noodles much more dense and chewy)
Mix together all ingredients in a bowl until the dough comes together. Knead and fold until it forms very stiff, dense mass. Roll and fold 3-4 times, then cover with plastic wrap for an hour or so. Run through a pasta roller starting on the widest setting until you get to a spaghetti/linguini thickness (my pasta roller’s setting #5), then cut into noodles. Cook for ~30sec in boiling water and serve immediately.
Assembling the dish
Slice your chilled pork belly, and put the slices in the braising liquid or broth to heat them back up. Cook your noodles, and strain them into whatever bowl you’re using. Ladle the broth over the noodles, top with the sliced and reheated pork belly, and season/garnish to taste with soy sauce, sriracha, sliced garlic, parsley, whatever you feel like putting on top. 

Check out Serious Eats for the inspiration for the recipe for the broth and the pork belly, and No Recipe for the noodles (No Recipe called for bread flour, but I used AP to no ill effect).  willteachforfood:jesstugas and I made ramen after a trip to one of Albany’s fantastic Asian grocery stores. We got the pork belly, seaweed, bonito, and kansui (alkaline salts) from the Asian market, and everything else came from the local P-Chops. The noodles were incredibly chewy and dense (thanks to the kansui), and the broth was really rich and flavorful thanks to the pork bones and chicken thighs. 
I used an amalgamation of a few different recipes and techniques.
Broth: 
~2lb pork bones
2-3 chicken thighs, bone-in, skin-on 
ginger, a 2-3” knob (peeled and cut into 1/4” or so thick slices)
1 head’s worth of garlic cloves, whole and peeled
2 bunches of scallion whites (cut them off just short of where they start to turn green)
1 large white onion, quartered and split into chunks (skin on or off, doesn’t matter)
2-3 shallots, halved (skin on or off, same as the onion)
enough water to cover all the stuff
Put everything but the pork and chicken on a sheet pan and broil on high for 5-7 minutes, until just slightly charred. put the bones, chicken thighs, and roasted veg in a stockpot and top with water. Bring to a boil, and bring down to a very low simmer. Let it go for 8-12 hours, topping off with water as needed. Strain, return to the pot, and keep hot until needed. (This can be done the day before)

Pork Belly
~2lb raw uncured pork belly (you’ll have to go to either a butcher or an Asian grocery store)
~2” knob of ginger, sliced
~6-8 cloves of garlic, whole, peeled
1 large onion, quartered (skin still on)
a handful of scallions, roughly chopped
1c water
1/2c soy sauce (I used low-sodium, not sure how much of a difference it makes)
1/4c mirin (sweetened rice wine for cooking, you can find this at most well-stocked supermarkets or at any asian market)
1/4c sake (I didn’t have any sake on hand, as one could imagine in upstate New York, so I used apple cider vinegar. It provides the same acidity and sweetness, and the flavor cooks off anyway. I’ve subbed in cider vinegar for sake in numerous recipes, and it always comes out just fine)
~1-2 tbsp honey or sugar
Bring the water, soy, mirin, and sake/vinegar to a boil and then bring down to a simmer in a dutch oven or any other heavy lidded pot. Add the ginger, garlic, scallions, and pork belly (which has been rolled and tied like in the picture), cover with the lid, and put in the oven at 275*F for 3-4 hours, flipping the pork belly every hour or so. Remove pork and braising liquid to a sealable container and refrigerate overnight (or until completely chilled)

Noodles
300g AP Flour
1/2c warm water
1tsp Kansui (Alkaline salts. This adds acidity to the dough and apparently makes the noodles much more dense and chewy)
Mix together all ingredients in a bowl until the dough comes together. Knead and fold until it forms very stiff, dense mass. Roll and fold 3-4 times, then cover with plastic wrap for an hour or so. Run through a pasta roller starting on the widest setting until you get to a spaghetti/linguini thickness (my pasta roller’s setting #5), then cut into noodles. Cook for ~30sec in boiling water and serve immediately.
Assembling the dish
Slice your chilled pork belly, and put the slices in the braising liquid or broth to heat them back up. Cook your noodles, and strain them into whatever bowl you’re using. Ladle the broth over the noodles, top with the sliced and reheated pork belly, and season/garnish to taste with soy sauce, sriracha, sliced garlic, parsley, whatever you feel like putting on top. 

Check out Serious Eats for the inspiration for the recipe for the broth and the pork belly, and No Recipe for the noodles (No Recipe called for bread flour, but I used AP to no ill effect).  willteachforfood:jesstugas and I made ramen after a trip to one of Albany’s fantastic Asian grocery stores. We got the pork belly, seaweed, bonito, and kansui (alkaline salts) from the Asian market, and everything else came from the local P-Chops. The noodles were incredibly chewy and dense (thanks to the kansui), and the broth was really rich and flavorful thanks to the pork bones and chicken thighs. 
I used an amalgamation of a few different recipes and techniques.
Broth: 
~2lb pork bones
2-3 chicken thighs, bone-in, skin-on 
ginger, a 2-3” knob (peeled and cut into 1/4” or so thick slices)
1 head’s worth of garlic cloves, whole and peeled
2 bunches of scallion whites (cut them off just short of where they start to turn green)
1 large white onion, quartered and split into chunks (skin on or off, doesn’t matter)
2-3 shallots, halved (skin on or off, same as the onion)
enough water to cover all the stuff
Put everything but the pork and chicken on a sheet pan and broil on high for 5-7 minutes, until just slightly charred. put the bones, chicken thighs, and roasted veg in a stockpot and top with water. Bring to a boil, and bring down to a very low simmer. Let it go for 8-12 hours, topping off with water as needed. Strain, return to the pot, and keep hot until needed. (This can be done the day before)

Pork Belly
~2lb raw uncured pork belly (you’ll have to go to either a butcher or an Asian grocery store)
~2” knob of ginger, sliced
~6-8 cloves of garlic, whole, peeled
1 large onion, quartered (skin still on)
a handful of scallions, roughly chopped
1c water
1/2c soy sauce (I used low-sodium, not sure how much of a difference it makes)
1/4c mirin (sweetened rice wine for cooking, you can find this at most well-stocked supermarkets or at any asian market)
1/4c sake (I didn’t have any sake on hand, as one could imagine in upstate New York, so I used apple cider vinegar. It provides the same acidity and sweetness, and the flavor cooks off anyway. I’ve subbed in cider vinegar for sake in numerous recipes, and it always comes out just fine)
~1-2 tbsp honey or sugar
Bring the water, soy, mirin, and sake/vinegar to a boil and then bring down to a simmer in a dutch oven or any other heavy lidded pot. Add the ginger, garlic, scallions, and pork belly (which has been rolled and tied like in the picture), cover with the lid, and put in the oven at 275*F for 3-4 hours, flipping the pork belly every hour or so. Remove pork and braising liquid to a sealable container and refrigerate overnight (or until completely chilled)

Noodles
300g AP Flour
1/2c warm water
1tsp Kansui (Alkaline salts. This adds acidity to the dough and apparently makes the noodles much more dense and chewy)
Mix together all ingredients in a bowl until the dough comes together. Knead and fold until it forms very stiff, dense mass. Roll and fold 3-4 times, then cover with plastic wrap for an hour or so. Run through a pasta roller starting on the widest setting until you get to a spaghetti/linguini thickness (my pasta roller’s setting #5), then cut into noodles. Cook for ~30sec in boiling water and serve immediately.
Assembling the dish
Slice your chilled pork belly, and put the slices in the braising liquid or broth to heat them back up. Cook your noodles, and strain them into whatever bowl you’re using. Ladle the broth over the noodles, top with the sliced and reheated pork belly, and season/garnish to taste with soy sauce, sriracha, sliced garlic, parsley, whatever you feel like putting on top. 

Check out Serious Eats for the inspiration for the recipe for the broth and the pork belly, and No Recipe for the noodles (No Recipe called for bread flour, but I used AP to no ill effect). 

willteachforfood:

jesstugas and I made ramen after a trip to one of Albany’s fantastic Asian grocery stores. We got the pork belly, seaweed, bonito, and kansui (alkaline salts) from the Asian market, and everything else came from the local P-Chops. The noodles were incredibly chewy and dense (thanks to the kansui), and the broth was really rich and flavorful thanks to the pork bones and chicken thighs. 

I used an amalgamation of a few different recipes and techniques.

Broth

  • ~2lb pork bones
  • 2-3 chicken thighs, bone-in, skin-on 
  • ginger, a 2-3” knob (peeled and cut into 1/4” or so thick slices)
  • 1 head’s worth of garlic cloves, whole and peeled
  • 2 bunches of scallion whites (cut them off just short of where they start to turn green)
  • 1 large white onion, quartered and split into chunks (skin on or off, doesn’t matter)
  • 2-3 shallots, halved (skin on or off, same as the onion)
  • enough water to cover all the stuff

Put everything but the pork and chicken on a sheet pan and broil on high for 5-7 minutes, until just slightly charred. put the bones, chicken thighs, and roasted veg in a stockpot and top with water. Bring to a boil, and bring down to a very low simmer. Let it go for 8-12 hours, topping off with water as needed. Strain, return to the pot, and keep hot until needed. (This can be done the day before)

Pork Belly

  • ~2lb raw uncured pork belly (you’ll have to go to either a butcher or an Asian grocery store)
  • ~2” knob of ginger, sliced
  • ~6-8 cloves of garlic, whole, peeled
  • 1 large onion, quartered (skin still on)
  • a handful of scallions, roughly chopped
  • 1c water
  • 1/2c soy sauce (I used low-sodium, not sure how much of a difference it makes)
  • 1/4c mirin (sweetened rice wine for cooking, you can find this at most well-stocked supermarkets or at any asian market)
  • 1/4c sake (I didn’t have any sake on hand, as one could imagine in upstate New York, so I used apple cider vinegar. It provides the same acidity and sweetness, and the flavor cooks off anyway. I’ve subbed in cider vinegar for sake in numerous recipes, and it always comes out just fine)
  • ~1-2 tbsp honey or sugar

Bring the water, soy, mirin, and sake/vinegar to a boil and then bring down to a simmer in a dutch oven or any other heavy lidded pot. Add the ginger, garlic, scallions, and pork belly (which has been rolled and tied like in the picture), cover with the lid, and put in the oven at 275*F for 3-4 hours, flipping the pork belly every hour or so. Remove pork and braising liquid to a sealable container and refrigerate overnight (or until completely chilled)

Noodles

  • 300g AP Flour
  • 1/2c warm water
  • 1tsp Kansui (Alkaline salts. This adds acidity to the dough and apparently makes the noodles much more dense and chewy)

Mix together all ingredients in a bowl until the dough comes together. Knead and fold until it forms very stiff, dense mass. Roll and fold 3-4 times, then cover with plastic wrap for an hour or so. Run through a pasta roller starting on the widest setting until you get to a spaghetti/linguini thickness (my pasta roller’s setting #5), then cut into noodles. Cook for ~30sec in boiling water and serve immediately.

Assembling the dish

Slice your chilled pork belly, and put the slices in the braising liquid or broth to heat them back up. Cook your noodles, and strain them into whatever bowl you’re using. Ladle the broth over the noodles, top with the sliced and reheated pork belly, and season/garnish to taste with soy sauce, sriracha, sliced garlic, parsley, whatever you feel like putting on top. 

Check out Serious Eats for the inspiration for the recipe for the broth and the pork belly, and No Recipe for the noodles (No Recipe called for bread flour, but I used AP to no ill effect). 

clmporg:

You may know the lovely and oh-so-generous literary citizen Amanda Bullock as the Director of Public Programming at Housing Works Books, but she is also the co-founder and co-organizer of the Moby-Dick Marathon (MDMNYC)! 

This three-day marathon reading of Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick, will be held in New York City from November 14th - November 16th (Ishmael super-fans may recognize the 14th as the anniversary of the U.S. publication of the book). In the past, over one hundred and fifty people participated in the event, each reading ten-minute segments of the novel. Three independent bookstores around the city hosted the reading: WORD, Molasses Books, and of course the Housing Works Bookstore and Cafe.

This year, MDMNYC hopes to expand their venue options, hire photographers and web designers, print programs in color, and provide their guests with more spoons for clam chowder! And they’re asking (nicely) for your help.

Show your support for this incredible project by backing their Kickstarter campaign! To make donating even more of a no-brainer, the MDMNYC team has also lined up some unreal-cool incentives for anyone who backs this whale of a project. The entire novel in Litograph poster-form? Yes please.

image

You can even get a special edition STOCK TIPS: Chowder Zine!

mobydickmarathonnyc:

Moby-Dick Marathon NYC by Amanda Bullock and MDMNYC — Kickstarter

HUGE HUGE EXCITING NEWS! We just launched a kickstarter for MDMNYC! We have some really amazing rewards thanks to our generous and amazing sponsors penguinclassics, outofprintclothing, King Post Productions, spudd64, Sophie Blackall, Brian Floca, biancastone, littleneckbk, amyvirginiabuchanan, litographs and more!

Check it out, spread the word, and maybe pledge to help bring the 2014 Moby-Dick Marathon NYC to life. Thank you!

All that and a #STOCK TIPS: Chowder Edition!